Programmable Thermostat Helps Lower Electricity Bills

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We’re so used to technology costing us money that it may be difficult to wrap your mind around the idea that a piece of technological hardware can actually save you money. But programmable thermostats, like the TXU Energy web-enabled Brighten® iThermostat, can save you money by helping you lower electricity bills.

ENERGY STAR® estimates that by properly using a programmable thermostat with preprogrammed settings, homeowners can save about $180 a year in energy costs. And that’s for garden variety programmable thermostats that let you set up a daily schedule before you leave your house. When you install a smart device like the Brighten® iThermostat, the savings can add up even more.

While programmable thermostats can vary in their functionality, they all save you money in the same basic way – by automatically lowering energy used for heating or cooling when you need less of it in your home. According to the Department of Energy, heating and cooling costs account for 56% of your electricity bill each month. By installing a programmable thermostat, you can save an average of 10% each year on these costs.

For example, during the day when your entire family is out of the house at work and school, you don’t really need to heat or cool your home as much as you do when people are present. You can set your programmable thermostat to automatically adjust temperature settings after everyone leaves, and to return the setting to a more comfortable level an hour before everyone returns home.

The Brighten® iThermostat touchscreen panel and user friendly interface also make it easy for anyone to learn how to set up a schedule. But this device also does one better. Because it’s web-enabled, you can adjust the settings or reprogram the thermostat from any Internet-capable device, such as your work PC or your smartphone.

Why’s this important? Say you’re out of town on an extended trip, and the weather patterns change unexpectedly while you’re gone. Or you end up getting on an earlier flight, and your home hasn’t been set to cool down for another four hours. With a web-enabled thermostat, you can reprogram your heating and cooling schedules right from your smartphone − whether you’re sitting comfortably in your hotel room or in a cab headed to the airport − all you need is a smartphone and an Internet connection.

Logging into the Brighten® iThermostat console online also gives you detailed charts on your energy usage as well as handy tools to help you track your home’s temperature settings against the local weather. To learn more about how the Brighten® iThermostat can work for your home, visit our website.

4 comments
GlendaHammer
GlendaHammer

That's not what I read.  Many people switch electric companies, because they think they will be saving on their electric bills.  Then the bills come in, and many times the bills are higher than what they were told, and it's all from all the electronic gadgets they've been talked into installing.  One company advertises you can get free electricity on weekends.  What they do is charge higher electricity rates Monday through Friday, to make up for the cheaper rates, they charge on weekends.  Nothing is free, the companies have it all planned out that no matter what, they'll make their profits.

UpaTree
UpaTree

Read an article years ago about how the electric industry in Texas was sold- resold - and sold again.  Works like this - A company rolls into town - buys the local power plant for more than its worth. That company finances the sale thru Bonds.  another company buys all the bonds and finances that thru - you guessed it - more bonds.  Each time the banks are making about $100 million for their part in doing the financing.   Now the Public service commission allows the utility to raise prices based on how much it takes to run the company.  well now it takes 3 times as much to run it because of the heavy bond debt load - and guess who gets to pay?  The company that came in and played the game - no, the legislatures that allowed them to play the game - no, I'll stop here.

antiquelady01
antiquelady01

Sounds like an advertisement for a thermostat to me.  The way to have kept our electric bills lower was to NOT to have de-regulated the UTILITY companies.

jshrops
jshrops

@antiquelady01 Yeahboy!  Let's replace the PUC with a smart thermostat and see the reaction from the utilities.